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After more than 30 years, the DeLorean Motor Company will resume production of the iconic 1982 model DeLorean, made famous by the “Back to the Future” film trilogy. 

It is a little-known fact that the design classic was previously massed produced for the American Market in a factory in Dunmurry, Northern Ireland.

DeLorean will use many existing parts in the reproduction – which have spent decades in a warehouse in Belfast. Although the cassette player and measly 130 horsepower engine won’t make it into the new model. The company has confirmed that the new engine, which will come from a yet-to-be-announced manufacturer, will be “considerably more powerful.” What’s more, the company says the new car will include bigger wheels, a sturdier braking system, and top-of-the-line shock absorbers. In other words, customers will get a near-replica of the original car that has safer, updated technology.

The car company was previously prohibited from producing the famed model because the futuristic design belonged to John DeLorean’s estate and not the auto business, which went bankrupt in 1982.

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DeLorean Factory in Dunmurry, Northern Ireland

 

The The DeLorean Motor Co. was revitalized by CEO Stephen Wynne and moved to Humble, Texas, in 1987. The company operated as a refurbishment facility, repairing and replacing parts for older DeLorean models for consumers around the world. Wynne estimates that DeLorean Motor Company has enough parts to build nearly 300 replica cars a year for the next 4 years and hopes to have the first car completed in early 2017.

The design aesthetics of the car will remain true to the original model, although some of the insides are going to be updated to meet modern day requirements and expectations. If you’re keen for one, it’s estimated that they’ll be released in early 2017.

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Simon Alcock is a Web Designer, Graphic Designer and Web Strategist based in Swords, Co. Dublin, Ireland. You can view his web and graphic design porfolio at http://simonalcock.com

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